3 minutes read

Creating Authority-Signed and Self-Signed Certificates in .NET

Whenever I get some free time I like to tackle certain projects that have piqued my interest. Often times I don’t get to complete these projects, or they take months to complete. In this case I’ve spent the last few months trying to get these samples to work. Hopefully you’ll find them useful. In the world of security, and more specifically in .NET, there aren’t a whole lot of options for creating certificates for development. Sure you could use makecert.exe or if you’re truly masochistic you could spin up a CA, but both are a pain to use and aren’t…

2 minutes read

My First CodePlex Project!

A few minutes ago I just finalized my first CodePlex project.  While working on the ever-mysterious Infrastructure 2010 project, I needed to integrate the Live Meeting API into an application we are using.  So I decided to stick it into it’s own assembly for reuse. I also figured that since it’s a relatively simple project, and because for the life of me I couldn’t find a similar wrapper, I would open source it.  Maybe there is someone out there who can benefit from it. The code is ugly, but it works.  I suspect I will continue development, and clean it…

3 minutes read

The Boston Tea Party has gone Batty

This morning I saw an interesting post on Twitter.  Which in-and-of-itself is kinda amazing, but that’s not the point.  The post was on something called the Windows 7 Sins site.  It is a campaign created by the Free Software Foundation to highlight everything that is wrong philosophically with Windows 7.  Now, I’m all for philosophical debates, but this is just plain batty.  So what did I do?  I acted!  I emailed the FSF people at campaigns@fsf.org the following email: Ya know, if you sold software, you wouldn’t need to keep asking people for money. Basic principle of economics. Just sayin….

8 minutes read

Stop Complaining About Software Expenses

It’s been a long week, and it’s only Monday.  It all started with an off-the-cuff comment.  It was of the petty nature, and it certainly wasn’t accurate.  It seems that is usually the case with petty comments. I was berated for suggesting SharePoint Services as a replacement for our ageing intranet, and the commenter responded with a quick “SharePoint?  Microsoft makes that, it’ll cost too much.  Our current java site works just fine, and it’s free.”  Or something of that nature.  How do you respond to a petty comment?  It’s pretty damn hard: While Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 does…