Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

Porting Kerberos.NET to .NET Core

I started the Kerberos.NET project with a simple intention: be able to securely parse Kerberos tickets for user authentication without requiring an Active Directory infrastructure. This had been relatively successful so far, but one major milestone that I hadn’t hit yet was making sure it worked with .NET Core. It now works with .NET Core. Porting a Project There is no automated way to port a project to .NET Core. This is because it’s a fundamentally different way of doing things in .NET and things are bound to break (I’m sure that’s not actually the reason). There is documentation available,…

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Active Directory Claims and Kerberos.NET

Active Directory has had the ability to issue claims for users and devices since Server 2012. Claims allow you to add additional values to a user’s kerberos ticket and then make access decisions based on those values at the client level. This is pretty cool because you normally can only make access decisions based on group membership, which is fairly static in nature. Claims can change based on any number of factors, but originate as attributes on the user or computer object in Active Directory. Not so coincidentally, this is exactly how claims on the web work via a federation…

Estimated reading time: 11 minutes

On Adding AES Support to Kerberos.NET

It’s been a few months since there’s been any public activity on the project but I’ve quietly been working on cleaning it up and there’s even been a PR from the community (thanks ZhongZhaofeng!). Part of that clean up process has been adding support for AES 128/256 tokens. At first glance you might think it’s fairly trivial to do — just run the encrypted data through an AES transform and you’re good to go — but let me tell you: it’s not that simple. On Securing Shared Secrets There’s primarily one big difference between how RC4 and AES are used in…

Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

Kerberos.NET: A Managed Ticket Validator

In my last post I talked about how Azure AD does Kerberos Single Sign-On. Conceptually it’s a simple process, but when you dig into the details of the implementation, there are some serious hurdles to overcome. The Active Directory side of things is straightforward — it’s just a matter of manually creating an SPN and keeping the secret in sync. It gets really complicated on the Azure AD side of things though. Consider the history of web-based Kerberos. IIS has supported this for decades by way of an ISAPI HTTP module that parses out the header and hands it off to the…

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

Creating Authority-Signed and Self-Signed Certificates in .NET

Whenever I get some free time I like to tackle certain projects that have piqued my interest. Often times I don’t get to complete these projects, or they take months to complete. In this case I’ve spent the last few months trying to get these samples to work. Hopefully you’ll find them useful. In the world of security, and more specifically in .NET, there aren’t a whole lot of options for creating certificates for development. Sure you could use makecert.exe or if you’re truly masochistic you could spin up a CA, but both are a pain to use and aren’t necessarily useful…